An Afternoon Thought: Atheist in Indonesia & Homosexual in Russia


To be an atheist in Indonesia is as hard and dangerous as being a homosexual in Russia. 

While in Indonesia, accusation goes to atheists as being in par with communist, confusing the act of free thinking with political idea, in Russia, a propaganda is being launched that a gay is in par with anti-christian, mixing sexual orientation with religious defamation.

Sometimes we just have to realize that, no matter how, we are living in the world full of ignorance and full of suppression, mentally and physically, to live the way certain group of people want us to live.

Many may say that they are tolerant people, but still turn blind eye when violence happens in front their eyes.

I don’t blame these people entirely. Sometimes I think, it’s because many of them don’t understand and are not well-informed due to political and religious barriers curbing them from seeing something from different perspective. That’s why I disagree if atheist and gay people hide somewhere completely, tolerating the intolerance, and making it even harder for the anti-atheist and anti-gay to understand our existence. Point taken that safety comes first. Still, there are thousands means to express ourselves, to notice the world that we are exist and function as well human beings.

To “Be yourself” is not easy. However, I believe that one day, voices will once again reunite humanity. Just like what Mandela had done to terminate the apartheid or feminist had achieved to allow women to vote in the 19 century.

– Riska

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3 thoughts on “An Afternoon Thought: Atheist in Indonesia & Homosexual in Russia

  1. Hi there,

    I stumbled upon your blog and I am curious about what you wrote above:
    To be an atheist in Indonesia is as hard and as dangerous as being a homosexual in Russia.

    I am Indonesian myself and having been living in The Netherlands for 18 years, perhaps I have been missing the actual info about atheism in Indonesia. Therefore I have three questions regarding that statement of yours:

    How open were you as an atheist during your time living in Indonesia?
    Did you experience being prosecuted or sought after being an atheist?
    Where did you live in Indonesia?

    • Hi Lorraine,

      Thank you for stopping by my blog.
      1. I wasn’t open for leaving islam until a year and a half before I left Indonesia. That was the time when my then-husband and I tried to approach my family and community before getting married.
      2. Being outcasted for about-to-marry my non-muslim husband, and eventually confessed to my family that I have been long time leaving islam, I had to live from different place to another, alone. Leaving home was the only option back then to avoid life-threatening acts. My husband had to leave a year earlier back to norway, while me processing my visa. 500 m from my parents’ home there is a famous protestant church being sealed by community, claiming that the neighborhood was predominantly muslim. Thus, it is kind of mentality of the neighborhood and local government where my parents’ live.
      I managed to avoid sought due to my friends’ helps, and my mom was still communicating with me in hidden, ensuring that my dad and other relatives didn’t know about my situation (preparing to leave the country).
      3. I lived in Bogor.

      Trauma? Yes. 4 months after I landed in Norway and finally moved in to copenhagen, i decided to lend a hand on this blog, being 100% open about my decision, has communicated with many other women and men trapped in the same situation like mine, and join the biggest indonesian atheis humanist community. Listening to their stories remind me that I am not alone, and even considered myself lucky as many also has almost been persecuted in front of their eyes.

      Again, thanks for stopping by my blog and enjoy the winter!

      cheers,
      riska

  2. Hi there,

    I stumbled upon your blog and I am curious about what you wrote above:
    To be an atheist in Indonesia is as hard and as dangerous as being a homosexual in Russia.

    I am Indonesian myself and having been living in The Netherlands for 18 years, perhaps I have missed the actual info about atheism in Indonesia.

    Therefore I have three questions regarding that statement of yours:
    How open were you as an atheist during your time living in Indonesia?
    Did you experience first hand being prosecuted or sought after being an atheist?
    Where did you live in Indonesia?

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